Evolutionary religion is the quest for truth. Revelatory religion IS that truth.

Our Savior, Jesus Christ - Yeshua

The Christus

Know therefore that the LORD thy God, he is God, the faithful God, which keepeth covenant and mercy

with them that love him and keep his commandments to a thousand generations; Deuteronomy 7:9

Link to the 613 Commandments (Mitzvot) of Judaism

www.jewfaq.org/613.htm, and/or this one by a rabbi: http://ohr.edu/judaism/articles/taryag.pdf.

A large number of these 613 relate to the ancient temple practices and are, of course, no longer valid. Many others still have efficacy in the Orthodox Jewish community.

Want to see Marlena's other sites?

http://comeuntochrist.blogspot.com/, http://judaicaworld.wordpress.com/, http://www.mormonsandjews.net/ http://www.jewishconvert-lds.com/ http://www.peopleofthebook-judaica.com/

New article by Marlena on JewishJournal.com.
Why Would a Jew Become a Mormon?

http://www.jewishjournal.com/jews_and_mormons/item/



A Mormon's Guide to Judaism, People of The Book and Notes of a Jewish Convert to the LDS Church available on Kindle!! Download them to your phone and read anytime. They will help you understand one of the three seminal religions and cultures; the similarities and differences between Judaism and the LDS Church.

For more info: marlenatanya@gmail.com

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To circumcise, or not to circumcise?

A practice that's been a religious obligation for millennia is now in dispute. Is circumcision "mutilation?"

The earliest circumcisions date back to around 2400 B.C.
The earliest circumcisions date back to around 2400 B.C. Photo: Uriel Sinai/Getty Images SEE ALL 48 PHOTOS
How did the practice start?The Egyptians were removing the foreskins of young boys as early as 2400 B.C., but the origins of circumcision remain a mystery. "It's like asking the question, 'Where did religion come from?'" said medical historian David L. Gollaher. Jews have performed the ritual on 8-day-old boys for at least 3,000 years, in accordance with God's commandment to Abraham that circumcising "the flesh of your foreskins...shall be a sign of the covenant between me and you." Muslims consider circumcision a purification ritual that can be performed on males of any age, and some African societies initiate pubescent boys into manhood through a circumcision ritual that tests their ability to withstand pain. For Americans, starting in the late 19th century, circumcision was touted as a cure for nervousness, masturbation, and imbecility. It remains a routine procedure in the U.S., with more than half of all boys circumcised — far more than in Europe.
Does the operation have real health benefits?
Three recent large-scale studies of African men have found that circumcision markedly lowers the risk of infection with HIV, the virus that causes AIDS; it also reduces infection from other sexually transmitted diseases, including the cancer-causing human papillomavirus (HPV). Researchers say that's because the foreskin can develop microscopic tears during sexual activity, allowing infections to more easily reach the bloodstream. Circumcision has also been found to reduce the risk of urinary-tract infections in a baby's first year. Citing those studies, the American Academy of Pediatrics in August shifted its previously neutral stance on circumcision and announced that the procedure has "significant" health benefits. For every 909 circumcisions, the pediatricians reported, one man will be spared a diagnosis of penile cancer.
So why do some people oppose it?Many frame their opposition to circumcision as a human rights issue: They see removing a healthy part of a newborn's body without his consent as an involuntary form of "mutilation" — a violation of medical ethics. "Babies should be left alone," said Georganne Chapin of the anti-circumcision group Intact America. "When they become men, they can make their own informed decision about whether they want to remove a part of their own penises." Chapin and other so-called "intactivists" dispute the evidence of circumcision's medical benefits — infections can be prevented with proper hygiene and condoms, they claim — and point to the pain involved and the risks of bleeding, infection, and other complications. Some critics also maintain that circumcision makes the penis less sensitive, robbing men of the full range of sexual pleasure. Intactivists seek to change society's attitudes about the operation, with the goal, according to movement leader Matthew Hess, of "making cutting boys' foreskin a federal crime."
Have they made progress?
The procedure is definitely becoming less prevalent. Rates of hospital circumcision in the U.S. have dropped from a high of about 79 percent in the 1970s to 55 percent in 2010, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. That may be partly because Medicaid has stopped paying for the surgery in 18 states; some insurance companies also have stopped covering it. In addition, Latin American immigrants tend not to circumcise. But another reason for the decline is that the moral argument against circumcision is swaying many American parents. In San Francisco last year, 12,000 citizens supported a ballot initiative that would have made circumcision a misdemeanor punishable by a fine of up to $1,000 or a year in jail. A judge blocked the referendum on a technicality, but the ban's sponsor, Lloyd Schofield, claimed victory. "Just getting people to think and discuss this is very rewarding," he said. And this year in Cologne, Germany, a regional court ruled that the botched ritual circumcision of a 4-year-old Muslim boy amounted to assault, and the German Medical Association counseled doctors to stop performing the operation.
How have religions responded?
Across Germany, furious protests by religious Jews and Muslims prompted lawmakers to draft a law making circumcision explicitly legal, as long as it is carried out by trained experts and parents are informed of medical risks. A similar clash ignited this summer in New York City, after city health officials found that in the last decade, 11 baby boys there had contracted herpes infections — and two of them had died — through a rare Orthodox Jewish rite called metzitzah b'peh, in which the mohel who performs ritual circumcision sucks the blood directly from the fresh wound. The city's Board of Health proposed making parents sign a form laying out the medical risks, but ultra-Orthodox Jewish leaders vowed to defy the order and last week won a temporary injunction. New parents not bound by religious custom, meanwhile, are facing the circumcision decision with considerable doubt and confusion. Circumcision "does have a medical benefit," says Dr. Doug Diekema, who took part in the American Academy of Pediatrics task force on the procedure. "Not everyone would trade that foreskin for that medical benefit. It's a hard decision, and there are good reasons for almost any decision you want to make."
The life of a mohel
Max Mintz has circumcised more than 9,700 babies during the past 30 years and expects to hit the 10,000 mark by year's end. A retired Houston-area pediatrician, he performs the ritual for Jewish families in Texas and across the country, and will happily circumcise non-Jewish babies, too. Mintz, who charges about $350 for his services, says the procedure takes about a minute, involving a deft cut with a ritual knife called an izmel. "If you know how to do something surgically, just changing to another instrument is not so difficult," Mintz said. "And the ritual method is so much simpler." An Orthodox Jew, Mintz is gratified to be able to marry his faith with his surgical skills. And performing a bris, the Hebrew word for circumcision, is "always a very happy occasion," he said. "I don't have to do funerals like a rabbi. Everyone wants to meet you."
From The Week magazine and online zine - www.theweek.com/article/index

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Biblical Roots of Judaism-Outline of Progress Series

Understanding the Old Testament Through Jewish Eyes:http://judaicaworld.wordpress.com/understanding-the-o-t-through-jewish-eyes/ *********************************************************

Chart of Tribal Lineage

Sometimes the tribes are listed genealogically (Gen. 35:23; I Chron. 2:1-2) sometimes in cultic formation (Num. 2-3; Deut. 27:12); and sometimes geographically (Num. 34:14-28; I Chron. 6:54 ff.; Ezek. 48:1 ff.). Usually twelve tribes are mentioned, but the identification of the tribes varies: in one Dinah is listed in place of Benjamin (Gen. 29-30), and in Chronicles both halves of the tribe of Manasseh are counted (I Chron. 2-3; 6:54-80). Some lists mention only ten tribes (Deut. 33:6 ff.; II Sam. 19:43); one gives eleven tribes (I King 11:31); and in Gen. 46:48 ff. there are thirteen. Gerald A. Larue, PhD.

Blog Archive

Ken Bowers - Champion of Freedom

Dear Reader: The fight for brotherhood and individual freedom is a universal one. The Jewish people are a sub-civilization - seemingly complete - and yet they have struggled for millenia to be able to enjoy the unalienable rights which a loving and benevolent God gave all of mankind. We must protect our freedoms. The Adversary relishes the opportunities he has to take them from us. One of the strongest advocates we have today is a man who has worked at the side of the great W. Cleon Skousen (www.en.wikipedia.org/wiki/cleonskousen). Ken Bowers is a brilliant researcher, popular speaker and the author of several books and CDs which provide deep insight on the issues of the secret combinations that threaten our country's freedom. Please check out his books. View his short video here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qdug-XaSMik If you are interested in Ken's books, email him at ken.bowers@yahoo.com. He will mail them to you. Please purchase through Ken. His website is: An Appeal to Heaven: http://www.kenbowers.blogspot.com/. You will be very interested in his books. New classics, intense, very readable! Beneath The Tide Beneath the Tide (Ken Bowers) Hiding In Plain Sight - for Latter-day Saints
Hiding in Plain Sight (Ken Bowers)
Quotations on Liberty - a compilation of quotations from General Authorities of the LDS church, our Founding Fathers and other great men and women throughout history. Knowing what threatens our peace helps to keep the peace.

The Gospel Dispensations

First: Six generations Adam (4,000 bc), Seth, Enos, Cainan, Mahaleleel, Jared Second: Three generations Enoch, Methuselah, Lamech Third: Ten generations Noah (2944 bc), Shem, Arphaxad, Salah, Eber, Peleg, Reu, Serug, Nahor, Terah Fourth: 14 generations Abraham (1992 b.c. if born when Terah was 130), Isaac, Jacob, Judah, David Fifth: 14 generations Moses, Jechonias, Jesus Christ (a.d. 7*) Sixth: Dispensation of Meridian of Time Commenced 1830-40 Twelve apostles Seventh: Dispensation Fulness of Times Joseph Smith (1805). The 7th dispensation began 1800 years after the 6th dispensation began. * refers to latter-day scholarship. From: Old Testament Student Manual: Genesis-2 Samuel; LDS Church Education System 1980

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Marlena with Messianic Jews

Marlena with Messianic Jews

Kippah - A Blessing On Your Head

It is perhaps the most instantly identifiable mark of a Jew.


In the Western world, it is customary to remove one's head covering when meeting an important person. In Judaism, putting on a head covering is a sign of respect.


The uniqueness of a Jewish head covering is hinted at in the blessing we say every morning, thanking God for "crowning Israel with splendor" (Talmud - Brachot 60b)


The kippah is a means to draw out one's inner sense of respect for God.

The Talmud says that the purpose of wearing a kippah is to remind us of God, who is the Higher Authority "above us" (Kiddushin 31a). External actions create internal awareness; wearing a symbolic, tangible "something above us" reinforces that idea that God is always watching. The kippah is a means to draw out one's inner sense of respect for God.


It's easy to remember God while at the synagogue or around the Shabbat table. But Jewish consciousness is meant to pervade all aspects of our lives ― how we treat others, how we conduct business, and how we look at the world.


Appropriately, the Yiddish word for head covering, "yarmulke," comes from the Aramaic, yira malka, which means "awe of the King."


In Hebrew, the head covering is called "kippah" ― literally "dome."


Making A Statement


To wear a kippah is to proclaim "I am a proud Jew." There is a fascinating phenomenon whereby non-observant Jews visiting Israel will wear a kippah for the duration of their stay. It may be out of a sense that the entire Land of Israel is holy like a synagogue. Or it may be the removal of any self-consciousness that can often accompany public expression of Jewishness in the diaspora.


Wearing a kippah makes one a Torah ambassador and reflects on all Jews.

Indeed, wearing a kippah is a big statement, and obligates the wearer to live up to a certain standard of behavior. A person has to think twice before cutting in line at the bank, or berating an incompetent waiter. Wearing a kippah makes one a Torah ambassador and reflects on all Jews. The actions of someone wearing a kippah can create a Kiddush Hashem (sanctification of God's name) or conversely a Chillul Hashem (desecration of His name).


Of course, putting on a kippah does not automatically confer "role model" status. Sometimes we unfortunately hear of a religious person caught in some indiscretion. I recall one time in Los Angeles, noticing that a drunken, disheveled man was walking down the street ― wearing a kippah! He wasn't Jewish, but he'd found an old kippah and thought it helped him fit in with the neighborhood atmosphere. For me, it drove home the idea that it's not fair to "judge Judaism" based on someone displaying the outer trappings of observance.


When To Wear A Kippah?


From a biblical standpoint, only the Kohanim serving in the Temple were required to cover their heads (see Exodus 28:4). Yet for many centuries, the obligatory custom has been for Jewish men to wear a kippah all the time, as the Code of Jewish Law says, "It is forbidden to walk four cubits without a head covering."


Does a kippah have to be worn while playing sports? This issue came to the fore recently with the publicity surrounding Tamir Goodman, the basketball sensation who is an observant Jew.


The answer is that it is preferable to wear even a small kippah, pinned to the hair. (Velcro works great!) If it is impossible because of the game conditions or rules, it is okay to play without a kippah.


When bathing or swimming, one does not wear a kippah.


Certainly, a head covering is obligatory while engaged in prayer and Torah study.


What kind of head covering qualifies? Basically anything ― including a baseball cap or a scarf tied around one's head. Of course, in the synagogue, it is more respectful to use a regular kippah.


A kippah should be large enough to be seen from all sides.

How large must a kippah be? Rabbi Moshe Feinstein states that the minimum measure is that "which would be called a head covering." Rabbi Ovadiah Yosef says the kippah should be large enough to be seen from all sides.


The style of kippah worn can reflect an interesting sociological phenomena, often denoting a person's group affiliation. For example, yeshivah-style Jews wear a black velvet kippah. Modern Orthodox Jews often wear a knitted, colored kippah. Many Chassidic Jews wear a fur hat (shtreimel) on Shabbat and holidays.


Additionally, many also wear a hat when they pray to increase awareness of the Almighty as they stand before Him. (Mishne Brura 183:11)


Rabbi Shraga Simmons, www.aish.com


Biblical Hebrew Names: by Index or Category

Check this out. Can be very helpful in learning Old Testament names and meanings in history.

http://www.bible-name.com/Hebrew-Names-Letter-74.htm



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Shabbat Menorah
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Moses Delivers The Law Into Hands of Priests


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