Evolutionary religion is the quest for truth. Revelatory religion IS that truth.

Our Savior, Jesus Christ - Yeshua

The Christus

Know therefore that the LORD thy God, he is God, the faithful God, which keepeth covenant and mercy

with them that love him and keep his commandments to a thousand generations; Deuteronomy 7:9

Link to the 613 Commandments (Mitzvot) of Judaism

www.jewfaq.org/613.htm, and/or this one by a rabbi: http://ohr.edu/judaism/articles/taryag.pdf.

A large number of these 613 relate to the ancient temple practices and are, of course, no longer valid. Many others still have efficacy in the Orthodox Jewish community.

Want to see Marlena's other sites?

http://comeuntochrist.blogspot.com/, http://judaicaworld.wordpress.com/, http://www.mormonsandjews.net/ http://www.jewishconvert-lds.com/ http://www.peopleofthebook-judaica.com/

New article by Marlena on JewishJournal.com.
Why Would a Jew Become a Mormon?

http://www.jewishjournal.com/jews_and_mormons/item/



A Mormon's Guide to Judaism, People of The Book and Notes of a Jewish Convert to the LDS Church available on Kindle!! Download them to your phone and read anytime. They will help you understand one of the three seminal religions and cultures; the similarities and differences between Judaism and the LDS Church.

For more info: marlenatanya@gmail.com

Search This Blog

The Spanish Expulsion, 1492













Little has been written of the Sephardim (Spanish, Latin) Jews and their great trials in history. Here is an excerpt from the Jewish Virtual Library that will give much insight into the tribulations of the 15th century Jewish communities in Spain.

In the same month in which their Majesties [Ferdinand and Isabella] issued the edict that all Jews should be driven out of the kingdom and its territories, in the same month they gave me the order to undertake with sufficient men my expedition of discovery to the Indies." So begins Christopher Columbus's diary. The expulsion that Columbus refers to was so cataclysmic an event that ever since, the date 1492 has been almost as important in Jewish history as in American history. On July 30 of that year, the entire Jewish community, some 200,000 people, were expelled from Spain.

Tens of thousands of refugees died while trying to reach safety. In some instances, Spanish ship captains charged Jewish passengers exorbitant sums, then dumped them overboard in the middle of the ocean. In the last days before the expulsion, rumors spread throughout Spain that the fleeing refugees had swallowed gold and diamonds, and many Jews were knifed to death by brigands hoping to find treasures in their stomachs.
The Jews' expulsion had been the pet project of the Spanish Inquisition, headed by Father Tomas de Torquemada. Torquemada believed that as long as the Jews remained in Spain, they would influence the tens of thousands of recent Jewish converts to Christianity to continue practicing Judaism. Ferdinand and Isabella rejected Torquemada's demand that the Jews be expelled until January 1492, when the Spanish Army defeated Muslim forces in Granada, thereby restoring the whole of Spain to Christian rule. With their most important project, the country's unification, accomplished, the king and queen concluded that the Jews were expendable. On March 30, they issued the expulsion decree, the order to take effect in precisely four months. The short time span was a great boon to the rest of Spain, as the Jews were forced to liquidate their homes and businesses at absurdly low prices. Throughout those frantic months, Dominican priests actively encouraged Jews to convert to Christianity and thereby gain salvation both in this world and the next.

The most fortunate of the expelled Jews succeeded in escaping to Turkey. Sultan Bajazet welcomed them warmly. "How can you call Ferdinand of Aragon a wise king," he was fond of asking, "the same Ferdinand who impoverished his own land and enriched ours?" Among the most unfortunate refugees were those who fled to neighboring Portugal. In 1496, King Manuel of Portugal concluded an agreement to marry Isabella, the daughter of Spain's monarchs. As a condition of the marriage, the Spanish royal family insisted that Portugal expel her Jews. King Manuel agreed, although he was reluctant to lose his affluent and accomplished Jewish community.

Read the entire article at: http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/

No comments:

Post a Comment

Biblical Roots of Judaism-Outline of Progress Series

Understanding the Old Testament Through Jewish Eyes:http://judaicaworld.wordpress.com/understanding-the-o-t-through-jewish-eyes/ *********************************************************

Chart of Tribal Lineage

Sometimes the tribes are listed genealogically (Gen. 35:23; I Chron. 2:1-2) sometimes in cultic formation (Num. 2-3; Deut. 27:12); and sometimes geographically (Num. 34:14-28; I Chron. 6:54 ff.; Ezek. 48:1 ff.). Usually twelve tribes are mentioned, but the identification of the tribes varies: in one Dinah is listed in place of Benjamin (Gen. 29-30), and in Chronicles both halves of the tribe of Manasseh are counted (I Chron. 2-3; 6:54-80). Some lists mention only ten tribes (Deut. 33:6 ff.; II Sam. 19:43); one gives eleven tribes (I King 11:31); and in Gen. 46:48 ff. there are thirteen. Gerald A. Larue, PhD.

Blog Archive

Ken Bowers - Champion of Freedom

Dear Reader: The fight for brotherhood and individual freedom is a universal one. The Jewish people are a sub-civilization - seemingly complete - and yet they have struggled for millenia to be able to enjoy the unalienable rights which a loving and benevolent God gave all of mankind. We must protect our freedoms. The Adversary relishes the opportunities he has to take them from us. One of the strongest advocates we have today is a man who has worked at the side of the great W. Cleon Skousen (www.en.wikipedia.org/wiki/cleonskousen). Ken Bowers is a brilliant researcher, popular speaker and the author of several books and CDs which provide deep insight on the issues of the secret combinations that threaten our country's freedom. Please check out his books. View his short video here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qdug-XaSMik If you are interested in Ken's books, email him at ken.bowers@yahoo.com. He will mail them to you. Please purchase through Ken. His website is: An Appeal to Heaven: http://www.kenbowers.blogspot.com/. You will be very interested in his books. New classics, intense, very readable! Beneath The Tide Beneath the Tide (Ken Bowers) Hiding In Plain Sight - for Latter-day Saints
Hiding in Plain Sight (Ken Bowers)
Quotations on Liberty - a compilation of quotations from General Authorities of the LDS church, our Founding Fathers and other great men and women throughout history. Knowing what threatens our peace helps to keep the peace.

The Gospel Dispensations

First: Six generations Adam (4,000 bc), Seth, Enos, Cainan, Mahaleleel, Jared Second: Three generations Enoch, Methuselah, Lamech Third: Ten generations Noah (2944 bc), Shem, Arphaxad, Salah, Eber, Peleg, Reu, Serug, Nahor, Terah Fourth: 14 generations Abraham (1992 b.c. if born when Terah was 130), Isaac, Jacob, Judah, David Fifth: 14 generations Moses, Jechonias, Jesus Christ (a.d. 7*) Sixth: Dispensation of Meridian of Time Commenced 1830-40 Twelve apostles Seventh: Dispensation Fulness of Times Joseph Smith (1805). The 7th dispensation began 1800 years after the 6th dispensation began. * refers to latter-day scholarship. From: Old Testament Student Manual: Genesis-2 Samuel; LDS Church Education System 1980

Total Pageviews

Marlena with Messianic Jews

Marlena with Messianic Jews

Kippah - A Blessing On Your Head

It is perhaps the most instantly identifiable mark of a Jew.


In the Western world, it is customary to remove one's head covering when meeting an important person. In Judaism, putting on a head covering is a sign of respect.


The uniqueness of a Jewish head covering is hinted at in the blessing we say every morning, thanking God for "crowning Israel with splendor" (Talmud - Brachot 60b)


The kippah is a means to draw out one's inner sense of respect for God.

The Talmud says that the purpose of wearing a kippah is to remind us of God, who is the Higher Authority "above us" (Kiddushin 31a). External actions create internal awareness; wearing a symbolic, tangible "something above us" reinforces that idea that God is always watching. The kippah is a means to draw out one's inner sense of respect for God.


It's easy to remember God while at the synagogue or around the Shabbat table. But Jewish consciousness is meant to pervade all aspects of our lives ― how we treat others, how we conduct business, and how we look at the world.


Appropriately, the Yiddish word for head covering, "yarmulke," comes from the Aramaic, yira malka, which means "awe of the King."


In Hebrew, the head covering is called "kippah" ― literally "dome."


Making A Statement


To wear a kippah is to proclaim "I am a proud Jew." There is a fascinating phenomenon whereby non-observant Jews visiting Israel will wear a kippah for the duration of their stay. It may be out of a sense that the entire Land of Israel is holy like a synagogue. Or it may be the removal of any self-consciousness that can often accompany public expression of Jewishness in the diaspora.


Wearing a kippah makes one a Torah ambassador and reflects on all Jews.

Indeed, wearing a kippah is a big statement, and obligates the wearer to live up to a certain standard of behavior. A person has to think twice before cutting in line at the bank, or berating an incompetent waiter. Wearing a kippah makes one a Torah ambassador and reflects on all Jews. The actions of someone wearing a kippah can create a Kiddush Hashem (sanctification of God's name) or conversely a Chillul Hashem (desecration of His name).


Of course, putting on a kippah does not automatically confer "role model" status. Sometimes we unfortunately hear of a religious person caught in some indiscretion. I recall one time in Los Angeles, noticing that a drunken, disheveled man was walking down the street ― wearing a kippah! He wasn't Jewish, but he'd found an old kippah and thought it helped him fit in with the neighborhood atmosphere. For me, it drove home the idea that it's not fair to "judge Judaism" based on someone displaying the outer trappings of observance.


When To Wear A Kippah?


From a biblical standpoint, only the Kohanim serving in the Temple were required to cover their heads (see Exodus 28:4). Yet for many centuries, the obligatory custom has been for Jewish men to wear a kippah all the time, as the Code of Jewish Law says, "It is forbidden to walk four cubits without a head covering."


Does a kippah have to be worn while playing sports? This issue came to the fore recently with the publicity surrounding Tamir Goodman, the basketball sensation who is an observant Jew.


The answer is that it is preferable to wear even a small kippah, pinned to the hair. (Velcro works great!) If it is impossible because of the game conditions or rules, it is okay to play without a kippah.


When bathing or swimming, one does not wear a kippah.


Certainly, a head covering is obligatory while engaged in prayer and Torah study.


What kind of head covering qualifies? Basically anything ― including a baseball cap or a scarf tied around one's head. Of course, in the synagogue, it is more respectful to use a regular kippah.


A kippah should be large enough to be seen from all sides.

How large must a kippah be? Rabbi Moshe Feinstein states that the minimum measure is that "which would be called a head covering." Rabbi Ovadiah Yosef says the kippah should be large enough to be seen from all sides.


The style of kippah worn can reflect an interesting sociological phenomena, often denoting a person's group affiliation. For example, yeshivah-style Jews wear a black velvet kippah. Modern Orthodox Jews often wear a knitted, colored kippah. Many Chassidic Jews wear a fur hat (shtreimel) on Shabbat and holidays.


Additionally, many also wear a hat when they pray to increase awareness of the Almighty as they stand before Him. (Mishne Brura 183:11)


Rabbi Shraga Simmons, www.aish.com


Biblical Hebrew Names: by Index or Category

Check this out. Can be very helpful in learning Old Testament names and meanings in history.

http://www.bible-name.com/Hebrew-Names-Letter-74.htm



Shabbat Menorah

Shabbat Menorah
Friday night worship

Moses Delivers The Law Into Hands of Priests


There was an error in this gadget